covid-19

COVID-19 Live Updates: News on coronavirus in Calgary for March 27


Watch this page throughout the day for updates on COVID-19 in Calgary

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With news on COVID-19 happening rapidly, we’ve created this page to bring you our latest stories and information on the outbreak in and around Calgary.


What’s happening now

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My COVID Story: How have you been impacted by coronavirus?

Postmedia is looking to speak with people who may have been impacted by COVID-19 here in Alberta.  Have you undergone a travel-related quarantine? Have you received your vaccine, and if so did you feel any side effects? Have you changed your life for the better because of the pandemic? Send us an email at reply@calgaryherald.com to tell us your experience, or send us a message via this form.

Read our ongoing coverage of personal stories arising from the pandemic.


Pharmacies in and around Calgary offering COVID-19 vaccine

This map shows 53 pharmacies in Calgary, Chestermere and Airdrie offering the COVID-19 vaccine. More locations will be added in the coming days, according to the provincial government. Appointments are still required and can be booked by contacting the participating pharmacies. Details on eligibility and booking can be found here.


668 new cases, 1 death

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Blood donations from those who have had COVID-19 are safe: Canadian Blood Services

A man donates plasma at a Canadian Blood Services centre in London, Ont.
A man donates plasma at a Canadian Blood Services centre in London, Ont. Photo by Mike Hensen/The London Free Press/Postmedia Network

Canadian Blood Services is reassuring the public that blood donated by anyone who has had COVID-19 or who has been vaccinated is safe.

“Given that COVID is a respiratory virus, there’s no impact to the blood as far as transmission to a patient. There is no concern,” said Chantale Pambrun, director of the Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation in Ottawa.

More than 955,000 people have been infected with COVID-19 in Canada in the past year and the long-term effects on survivors are still mostly unknown.

The blood donation agency has added some pre-screening questions about whether a potential donor has been exposed to COVID-19 in the past two weeks or contracted the novel coronavirus in the past 28 days.

Read more.


Friday

717 cases, 3 deaths

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Alberta has found another 325 cases of more-contagious variants of COVID-19 as the strains begin to make up more of the province’s active infections.

All 325 of the newly detected variant cases are the B.1.1.7 strain, which originated in the United Kingdom.

In total, the province has found 2,626 variant cases, the vast majority of which are B.1.1.7. Among those cases, 1,654 remain active, representing 23.4 per cent of Alberta’s total active infections.

Friday continued a recent increase in COVID-19 case rates in Alberta, with the province reporting another 717 cases of the novel coronavirus. It’s the second-highest total since Jan. 15, topped only by the previous day’s 764 cases.

The new infections came from 13,308 tests, representing a 5.4 per cent test positivity rate. It’s an increased positivity rate from the previous months, but falls in line with the seven-day average.

The new cases brought the number of active cases in Alberta above 7,000 for the first time since Jan. 28.

Read more.


Friday

Norway keeps AstraZeneca vaccine on hold for another 3 weeks

A vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine
A vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine Photo by Jack Boland/Postmedia

Norway will delay its decision on whether to resume the use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine by up to three weeks, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (FHI) said on Friday.

Authorities on March 11 suspended the rollout of the vaccine after a small number of younger inoculated people were hospitalized for a combination of blood clots, bleeding and a low count of platelets, some of whom later died.

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“We have decided to continue the pause and make a new decision by April 15,” FHI chief Camilla Stoltenberg told broadcaster NRK.

“We have started several processes to map out whether there is a causality and to have a better basis to establish the real risk and a cost-benefit analysis for different age groups. To get more knowledge, it is necessary to have more time.”

Norway is one of over a dozen European countries to have suspended the rollout of the vaccine over safety concerns, although most nations have since resumed its use on the advice of the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

Read more.


Friday

Who have provinces pegged to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the coming weeks?

Nurse Brenda Lotakoun draws a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as nurses from Humber River Hospital staff administer vaccines to residents, staff, and volunteers at one of B’nai Brith Canada’s affordable housing buildings on March 23, 2021 in Toronto, Canada.
Nurse Brenda Lotakoun draws a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as nurses from Humber River Hospital staff administer vaccines to residents, staff, and volunteers at one of B’nai Brith Canada’s affordable housing buildings on March 23, 2021 in Toronto, Canada. Photo by Cole Burston/Getty Images

As COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up across the country, most provinces and territories have released details of who can expect to receive a shot in the coming weeks.

The military commander handling logistics for Canada’s vaccine distribution program says there will be enough vaccine delivered to give a first dose before Canada Day to every adult who wants one.

Follow this link for a list of the inoculation plans throughout Canada.


Friday

COVID-shaming is highest in the Maritimes, professor says

Those who flout coronavirus regulations in the Maritimes are likely to get called out for it.
Those who flout coronavirus regulations in the Maritimes are likely to get called out for it. Photo by Getty Images

Fear of contracting COVID-19 is common everywhere in Canada, but for many in the Maritimes, there’s something they fear even more: the public shaming they’ll receive if they test positive.

An article in the New York Times last month detailed the phenomenon, saying it was particularly prevalent in Canada’s Maritime provinces, where people have reportedly been shunned by neighbours, family and friends if they’re perceived to be skirting COVID-19 regulations.

Dr. Robert Huish, an associate professor in the International Development Studies department at Dalhousie University in Halifax, N.S., is conducting a study on the public shaming and stigma faced by people in Nova Scotia who have tested positive for coronavirus or are perceived to be breaking the rules.

“Cars were keyed, hostilities took place in parking lots,” said Huish. “Students who lined up for mass testing were scolded by cars driving by.”

Read more.

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